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THE WORST BUSINESS CEOS IN AMERICA

Mired in financial and legal trouble, Talos Partners CEO, Robert V. Brazell tops our list

NEWS TO HELP INVESTORS AVOID TAKING A BEATING

BEFORE YOU INVEST, RUN A GOOGLE SEARCH ON INDIVIDUALS AND COMPANIES SAYS LEADING WHITE COLLAR CRIMINAL ATTORNEY

Why does worstceos.com exist? Why spend all the time, money and effort aggregating information on Robert V. Brazell (aka Rob Brazell) and other partners? Because as a leading white collar criminal attorney has stated—victims can avoid losses if they simply Google the individuals before investing.

 

Below is a true story where investors could have avoided their losses had they conducted even a cursory search before investing.

 

The Deseret News ran a detailed article on Marc Jenson and his brother, Stephen Jenson, who were recently charged with four counts of communications fraud, three counts of money laundering, and one count of pattern of unlawful activity, all second-degree felonies.  The Salt Lake Tribune also wrote up the story here.

 

This appears to be a run-of-the-mill pitch where they solicited investors for a the Mount Holly Ski Resort development  in Beaver County and other investments.  The problem is that the brothers failed to disclose some key information to potential investors.  If there is one thing you need to remember about investment pitches, it is that everything needs to be disclosed.

 

Specifically, the charging documents state that the Jensons failed to inform investors that there were serious problems with the resort development, including local community opposition, defaulted loans and ongoing litigation.  These are certainly the kinds of things that most investors would like to know about before investing in a real estate project. But even if these things are not disclosed voluntarily they are things that a prudent investor would have discovered when they conducted their independent due diligence on the property at issue.

 

But more significantly, when he pitched the investment Marc Jenson failed to mention the fact that he had recently spent twelve months in federal prison after pleading guilty to charges of making false statements to a financial institution and  failure to file federal income tax returns.  He also failed to mention to the potential investors that he had been charged with fraud, money laundering and sale of unregistered securities in 2005 and hadn’t yet repaid  the $4.1 million restitution ordered in that prior case.  These are the kinds of things that investors like to know about before investing.

 

But here’s the point.  Although Marc Jenson can be faulted (and charged criminally) for failing to tell investors that he had prior convictions for securities fraud, the information was almost certainly relatively easy to find.  The victims who invested with the Jenson brothers in 2007 and 2008 could have discovered much of this criminal history, not to mention the problems with the development project, with a simple Google search before they invested.  Moreover, had they hired an attorney to assist with their due diligence, a simple court docket search and call to the Division of Securities would have revealed many of these problems and they never would have invested.  Isn’t it worth paying an attorney several hundred dollars to avoid losing hundreds of thousands?

 

Other than that, the indictment alleges that Marc Jenson allegedly behaved like a typical fraudster; living in homes worth millions of dollars, taking expensive vacations, and driving exotic cars — all paid for by unwitting investors.

 

See full article here.

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Robert V. Brazell tops our list of small business CEOs that fails time and again to provide returns, while living high off investor's money. Now mired in legal and financial trouble, the truth about Rob Brazell is finally reaching the market where potential investors can make better and more informed decisions before putting their money at risk.

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